Eating Towns and Drinking Towns

Trulia Restaurant Density Heatmap Eating Towns and Drinking Towns

In another well done data analysis from Trulia, the real estate technology company uses US Census data to map out the country’s bars and restaurants.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, San Francisco reigns supreme in the restaurant contest, with one restaurant for every 243 households in the city.  Trulia compares this data to the median price per square foot for for-sale houses and in that chart, it quickly becomes clear that in general, higher income provides for a greater ability to patronize (and support) a bustling restaurant culture.

Top Metros for Eating Out
# U.S. Metro Restaurants per 10,000 households Median price per sqft of for-sale homes
1 San Francisco, CA 39.3 $459
2 Fairfield County, CT 27.6 $222
3 Long Island, NY 26.5 $217
4 New York, NY-NJ 25.3 $275
5 Seattle, WA 24.9 $150
6 San Jose, CA 24.8 $319
7 Orange County, CA 24.8 $260
8 Providence, RI-MA 24.3 $146
9 Boston, MA 24.2 $219
10 Portland, OR-WA 24.0 $129

Note: among the 100 largest metros.

Can you guess which city in the US has the greatest number of bars per capita?  I’ll give you a hint – you can get drive-thru margaritas and the city is nicknamed “The Big Easy”.  Yup, good ol’ New Orleans ranks #1 with one bar for every 1,173 households.  Interestingly, the median price per square foot for for-sale houses is significantly lower than for San Francisco, which ranks #8 by this measure.  It looks like sustaining a thriving bar scene does not have the same income requirements as restaurants.

Top Metros for Drinking
# U.S. Metro Bars per 10,000 households Median price per sqft of for-sale homes
1 New Orleans, LA 8.6 $99
2 Milwaukee, WI 8.5 $109
3 Omaha, NE-IA 8.3 $79
4 Pittsburgh, PA 7.9 $91
5 Toledo, OH 7.2 $71
6 Syracuse, NY 7.0 $86
7 Buffalo, NY 6.8 $91
8 San Francisco, CA 6.0 $459
9 Las Vegas, NV 6.0 $69
10 Honolulu, HI 5.9 $390

Note: among the 100 largest metros.

Trulia Bar Density Heatmap Eating Towns and Drinking Towns

I’d love to see these maps overlaid for a compare and contrast of the various metro areas featured in this analysis.  Interesting, it looks like the middle of the country has a considerably higher density of bars (relative to the rest of the country) than it does restaurants.

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